Dissolution of a Nation

Citing “the public interest in the administration of justice”, the law society claims that the personal views and preferences of an “overwhelming majority” of lawyers must be imposed on a private Christian school. This is majority coercion directed against a minority. The law society violates the rule of law and the Charter and attacks the foundations of Canadian freedom. John Carpay, the Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms

Canada, which once stood on rock — Christianity and its beliefs and principles — now stands on sand, shifting and fragmenting.

This has long been evident to many Canadians now grappling for something solid to hold onto, for absolutes now abandoned.

Never has this sad reality become more obvious than with four recent legal developments. The first is the Supreme Court decision slapping down Trinity Western University by denying them the right to issue accredited law degrees. The second is the nation-wide legalization of marijuana, making Canada the first G7 nation to do so. The third is the arrest warrant for a Calgary man for a ‘hate crime’ related to Toronto’s 2016 Pride Parade. And the fourth is Bill C-66 becoming law. All signalling, one way or another, that Canada has turned a dark corner into an even darker alley where it now appears that it’s only Canada’s dedication to decadence that holds the country together.

If, indeed, Canada can still be called a country. Of which more later.

TWU decision

But first the TWU decision which came June 15 when, in a pair of 7-2 rulings by the Supreme Court of Canada, the majority of justices found that the law societies of British Columbia and Ontario have the power to refuse accreditation based on evangelical Trinity Western university’s community covenant requiring its students to abstain from sex unless they are in a heterosexual marriage.

Simply, the covenant means that students – whether heterosexual or homosexual – must promise to abide by traditional Christian teaching on sexual practice which is restricted to heterosexual marriage alone. Which, in turn, is the basis of family and the safe and successful rearing of children, as it has been for millennia.

In other words, all TWU students are called upon to practice that old-fashioned virtue quaintly known as chastity. Which, until very recently in human history, was regarded as not only biblically sound and a source of untold grace but also based on common sense. In today’s brutal culture, however, chastity is now regarded as so difficult and so pointless as to potentially deform the mind, body and soul of anyone so bent as to attempt it.

The justices ruled that the covenant would deter LGBT students from attending the proposed law school, and that those who did attend would be at risk of unspecified harm.

What this really means is that the ruling of an unelected body has allowed the sensibilities of a small, but highly-activist, minority to obliterate the freedoms of thought and choice of the majority of Canadians, resulting in the Christian-based university losing accreditation for its planned new law school.

In addition, that decision may have even greater ramifications, suggested days later when Toronto police issued a Canada-wide warrant for a Calgary man on charges of LGBT ‘hate’ crimes.

Bill Whatcott, who at this writing was promising to turn himself in to Calgary Police on June 22, is charged with inciting hatred for handing out flyers at the 2016 Toronto Pride Parade warning of the spiritual and biological dangers of sodomy. Whatcott has been charged by Toronto 51 Division with the indictable offence of inciting hatred under Section 391 of Canada’s Criminal Code.

“The ‘crime’?” Whatcott wrote on the website Free North America. “My ministry bringing the Gospel and the truth about homosexuality to Toronto’s homosexual pride parade in 2016,”

Whatcott and five others are reported to have marched in the parade and handed out 3,000 packages on ‘Zombie Safe Sex’ that included a flyer entitled: “We want you to practice safe sex.” The flyer is also reported to have excoriated the “homosexual activism” of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, former Liberal defence minister Bill Graham, and former Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne. It also blasted Wynne’s sex-ed curriculum and its connection to former deputy minister of education Ben Levin, convicted in 2015 of three child pornography charges.

“Canada has embarked on a destructive journey toward sexual anarchy and homosexual inspired oppression,” the pamphlet declared.

Whatcott was expected to be flown to Toronto to answer to the charges in court, and for a bail hearing, Constable De Kloet told LifeSiteNews.

Bill C-66

Ironically, the Whatcott warrant came on the eve of Bill C-66 to expunge gay-sex criminal records taking effect across Canada. Bill C-66 allows Canadians, or family members of Canadians who have died, to apply to erase past criminal convictions for three offences — buggery, gross indecency and anal intercourse. All signalling that with the normalization of homosexuality in Canada, there will be no going back. The bill is a companion piece to the historic apology Trudeau issued in the House of Commons last November to members of the gay, lesbian, bisexual or two-spirited community said to be facing discrimination in the federal public service or military.

The Whatcott warrant also came mere hours after the anvil everyone knew was coming finally dropped. Bill C-45 legalizing recreational marijuana and paving the way for a full legal recreational cannabis market was passed by the Senate in a 52-29 vote, making Canada the first G7 nation to legalize the drug.

“I’m feeling just great,” chirped Sen. Tony Dean, who sponsored the bill in the Senate. “We’ve just witnessed a historic vote for Canada. The end of 90 years of prohibition. Transformative social policy, I think. A brave move on the part of the government. Now we can start to tackle some of the harms of cannabis. We can start to be proactive in public education. We’ll see the end of criminalization and we can start addressing Canada’s $7-billion illegal market. These are good things for Canada.”

Really?

Bill C-45

Bill C-45, otherwise known as the Cannabis Act, stems from a Trudeau campaign pledge to keep marijuana away from underage users and reduce related crime. The act to legalize the recreational use of weed was first introduced on April 13, 2017, and passed in the House of Commons in November. The Senate passage of the bill was the final hurdle in the process.

The justice minister, Jody Wilson-Raybould, also applauded the vote. “This is an historic milestone for progressive policy in Canada,” she tweeted. “This legislation will help protect our youth from the risks of cannabis while keeping profits out of the hands of criminals and organized crime.”

Right.

Trudeau was equally effusive in his praise for the bill. “It’s been too easy for our kids to get marijuana – and for criminals to reap the profits. Today, we change that. Our plan to legalize & regulate marijuana just passed the Senate,” he tweeted.

Senator Linda Frum disagreed: “A sad day for Canada’s kids,” she tweeted. Was Frum exhibiting more knowledge than the PM about the extensive psychiatric and physical damage that countless Canadian teenagers, while still in their developmental stage, have inflicted on themselves by smoking pot?

Apparently such serious concerns, registered by worried parents across the country since the bill was introduced, have counted for nothing. Among them a seasoned Ontario family physician who, when asked about the potential impact of legalization on daily life in Canada, replied simply: “Everybody’s going to be on it.”

The world’s first ‘post-national state’

Which brings us to the state of this country, as defined by Justin Trudeau, who, after his majority electoral victory in October 2015, confirmed that the decades-long mission of culturally and ethnically fragmenting the nation has been accomplished. And indeed, Canada has ‘progressed’ further than that. According to the PM, Canada is no longer even a multicultural state — or a nation — but something the world has never before seen. “There is no core identity, no mainstream in Canada,” Trudeau boasted. “There are (just) shared values — openness, respect, compassion, willingness to work hard, to be there for each other, to search for equality and justice. Those qualities are what make us the first post-national state.”

In other words, according to Trudeau, Canada has morphed into a state adrift, severed from its cultural, ethnic and moral moorings.

And, ironically, the process by which all this has happened provides further proof of how absolute the natural and moral order is that lawmakers have been seeking to undermine and destroy.

It also illustrates how dissolutions of nations occur gradually over time, beginning with the destruction of the ground floor, and working up, like an army of termites, until the entire edifice “spontaneously” collapses.

Even so, the collapse of Canada’s foundational nationality has not been spontaneous. Not at all. Nor did it happen overnight. In reality, Canada’s cultural edifice has been brought down incrementally, by a series of progressive policies and laws spanning more than half a century, beginning in 1962. And during the course of this disintegration, the political and legal thinking which brought it about appears to have had a complete disregard for human nature, the human condition and the moral framework human beings require to survive and prosper side by side.

The multicultural mission

In 1962, just as Canadians began to embrace notions of how ‘freeing’ contraception would be for the average woman and her family, Prime Minister John Diefenbaker’s Progressive Conservative government declared that independent immigrants and their immediate families — who would be needed to replace the children Canadian women would not be having — would be admitted to Canada from everywhere in the world.

In 1965, Canada signed the United Nations International Convention on All Forms of Racial Discrimination. This, in turn, led to the Pearson government’s universal admissions policy that meant that Canada from then on was morally obligated to embrace immigrants from around the world without reference to their ethnic, racial, religious or cultural origins. This meant that no longer would the nation’s cultural or religious cohesion be a consideration. Which, in turn, led to the transformation of Canada’s demographic structure.

Then, in 1971, ‘multiculturalism’ was declared official state policy. Henceforth, Canada was no longer perceived as consisting of our two founding cultures, English and French, but as mosaic of equivalent ethnic fragments, leaving Canada open to an unanticipated storm of social engineering.

By 1977, immigrants from ‘non-traditional’ regions made up over 50% of annual flows, creating the conditions for Canada’s development into one of the most culturally diverse countries in the world. With much self-congratulation, little criticism and almost no analysis.

In 1982, Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms — forming part of the Constitution Act — was signed into law, relegating Parliament to a secondary role — and through this move, diminishing the ability of a majority of the population to influence the direction of the country. Which, in turn, has provided the increasingly activist courts with the grounds to rule largely in favour of minorities, particularly when it comes to questions related not so much to religion in general as Christianity in particular.

Suicidal social diseases

Which may account for why, Canada, in her current ‘state’, is also suffering from a laundry list of suicidal social diseases – from abortion and the destruction of the traditional family to skyrocketing levels of depression and euthanasia and all the stops in between. All under the umbrella of ‘diversity’ and ‘multiculturalism’ which the secular ruling class has never allowed its citizenry to vote on.

As a result, a series of governments have been allowed to chase every conceivable ‘progressive’ whim of the past half century, shaping Canada into the increasingly incoherent ‘state’ it has become as the supine population, still imagining they are free, continues to allow mindless politicians and unelected bodies to make up their minds for them.

Yet there’s a supreme irony here too: The dissolution of Canada is not about immigration and/or multiculturalism. It never has been.

Instead, as it now appears, the buzzwords of ‘diversity’ and ‘multiculturalism’ have always been the convenient pretexts for reforming and reshaping Canada into the secularist socialist state so beloved by progressives. All the while ignoring the truth — in the name of an ever more divisive multiculturalism. And that truth is this: all native-born Canadians and immigrants from around the world making their homes in Canada – are made by God in His likeness and image; and all know perfectly well the difference between right and wrong, morality and immorality, decency and indecency, virtue and vice. Fundamental morality is not relative; it is not cultural and no lying government policy can alter that truth. Aborting a baby in Canada is not and never will be a human right and it is just as murderous in Canada as aborting a baby in South Africa.

Here’s my question: for how much longer will self-serving Canadian lawmakers be allowed to use the convenient excuse of ‘official multiculturalism’ to rip this country morally asunder, all the while pretending that one group doesn’t understand ‘right’ and ‘wrong’, ‘wisdom’ and ‘wickedness’ in exactly the same way that all the other groups do?

Screwtape must be well pleased.

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Paula Adamick is founding editor of The Canada Post, the newspaper serving the Canadian expat community in the United Kingdom (about 200,000 of us) from 1997 to 2012. With a BA in English and Journalism and a UK Masters degree in International Journalism, Adamick has also served as arts correspondent for The Scotsman and as a frequent contributor to The Evening Standard, and The Daily Mail (all UK) as well as to Canadian publications such as Challenge and Catholic Insight.